The Civil War and God’s Will

“Both read the same Bible and pray to the same God, and each invokes His aid against the other. It may seem strange that any men should dare to ask a just God’s assistance in wringing their bread from the sweat of other men’s faces, but let us judge not, that we be not judged. The prayers of both could not be answered.”  Abraham Lincoln, Second Inaugural Address, Saturday, March 4, 1865.

Abraham Lincoln was well-versed in the Bible and had a sense that God was unknowable.  Both sides of the Civil War assumed they knew God’s will was in their favor in their opposing causes.  One side was wrong.

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I’m a busy, happily retired guy who is enjoying life with the love of my life, Jackie. I thrive to be in the moment, remembering that I will die someday (memento mori). That is the only thing that I know for sure. I have spent a great portion of my life studying and contemplating the Bible and the way of the Christian life. One of my passions is to write what I think. You may not agree with me and that's okay. That's what makes life so spicy and delicious! My intention is not to try and convince you to change or to denigrate any religion. I am not that smart. I am not a cleric or a biblical scholar. All of my writing comes from a layman's point of view.

One thought on “The Civil War and God’s Will

  1. God flipped a coin! Even though the bible condones slavery, the confederates, who were fighting for slavery, lost the war. What’s up with that. Did the coin drop the wrong way?

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